Tag: management

Building the Release process in 3 steps

1. High Level

Aligned to your release model, details the major stages of a release: plan, build, accept and deploy and how the lower level activities fit within that: scope, requirements, build & test, acceptance, implementation, early life support and also show checkpoints (scope finalisation, build completion) and show gateways which align to your other processes such as governance, Change Advisory Boards etc). It’s also worth showing which environment various activities take place.

Build a timeline. Start from the ‘go live’ checkpoint at day 0, work backwards (T-) and plot in the major stages for an average release type (you may need one per model) and then plot other activity: environment management (data refreshes, interface switching etc), comms plan and enough lower level activity.

This high level lets you see the whole picture and start identifying areas of contention. If you have release cycles which last for several weeks and which are implemented monthly, you can expect some overlap. Examine these areas of overlap, it’s not uncommon to find the same teams doing different activities at the same time. Does this work for you?

Release Strategy: Size vs Frequency

Something I’ve run up against several times at several different organisations is making sure that the release process, policy and schedule is fit for purpose not only in terms of being compliant with best practice (such as ITIL) and controls (such as COBIT) and any other requirements within the business, but also to ensure that your change and release structure can cope with the volume of change.

Let’s assume your organisation has two broad categories of changes which are bundled into releases – new business functionality in the form of BCRs (Business Change Requests) and problem fixes.

We’ll also assume that you have a monthly release model which includes:

1. Scope and Design finalisation (1 week)
2. Build & Test finalisation (2 weeks)
3. Running an automated regression pack (1 week plus 2 days for final fixes to go as deltas on top of the main release)
4. Cutover and implementation activity (3 days)
5. Early Life Support (2 weeks) (ELS is an ITIL term which used to be called release warranty – in essence, a period of enhanced support following a release or where incidents/problems follow an accelerated support model compared with normal Business As Usual support).